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Educational Studies in Mathematics

, Volume 76, Issue 3, pp 305–328 | Cite as

Using what matters to students in bilingual mathematics problems

  • Higinio Domínguez
Article

Abstract

In this study, the author represented what matters to bilingual students in their everyday lives—namely bilingualism and everyday experiences—in school-based mathematical problems. Solving problems in pairs, students demonstrated different patterns of organizing and coordinating talk across problem contexts and across languages. Because these patterns bear consequences for how bilinguals experience mathematics learning, the author takes these patterns as the basis to argue that mathematics education for bilingual students should capitalize on bilingualism and experiences as cognitive resources.

Keywords

Elementary mathematics Bilingualism Everyday experiences Languaging 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Texas State UniversityAustinUSA

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