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Educational Studies in Mathematics

, Volume 76, Issue 3, pp 247–263 | Cite as

The significance of mathematical knowledge in teaching elementary methods courses: perspectives of mathematics teacher educators

  • Rina Zazkis
  • Dov Zazkis
Article

Abstract

Our study investigates perspectives of mathematics teacher educators related to the usage of their mathematical knowledge in teaching “Methods of Teaching Elementary Mathematics” courses. Five mathematics teacher educators, all with experience in teaching methods courses for prospective elementary school teachers, participated in this study. In a clinical interview setting, the participants described where and how, in their teaching of elementary methods courses, they had an opportunity to use their advanced mathematical knowledge and provided examples of such opportunities or situations. We outline five apparently different viewpoints and then turn to the similar concerns that were expressed by the participants. In conclusion, we connect the individual perspectives by situating them in the context of unifying themes, both theoretical and practical.

Keywords

Teacher education Elementary methods course Mathematics teacher educator Teachers’ knowledge 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.Center for Research in Mathematics and Science EducationSan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA

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