Context-Sensitive Cognitive and Educational Testing

Review Article

Abstract

This article reviews four interrelated approaches to reducing an inequitable gap in cognitive and educational test scores between individuals of a dominant culture and individuals of other cultures or subcultures. These approaches include (a) use of broader measures, (b) performance- and project-based assessments, (c) direct measurement of knowledge and skills relevant to environmental adaptation, and (d) dynamic assessment. It is concluded that when appropriate assessment is done that recognizes students’ diverse cultural and social backgrounds, equity can increase, predictive validity of cognitive and educational tests can increase, and at the same time, racial/ethnic/culture differences can decrease.

Keywords

Intelligence Adaptation Analytical intelligence Creative intelligence Practical intelligence 

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Cornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Human DevelopmentCollege of Human EcologyIthacaUSA

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