Educational Psychology Review

, Volume 25, Issue 3, pp 361–389

Toward a Conceptual Model of Mentoring Research: Integration with Self-Regulated Learning

Review Article

Abstract

In this article, we present a model for academic mentoring research that incorporates theory and research on self-regulated learning. Academic mentoring research has increased in recent years, and researchers have linked mentoring with positive outcomes for protégés and mentors. This research, however, has not investigated the process whereby mentoring exerts its effects. An integration of mentoring with self-regulated learning seems valuable because self-regulated learning researchers have employed methodologies to assess its dynamic nature. We review assumptions of mentoring and self-regulated learning theories, representative mentoring research studies, and methods of assessing self-regulated learning. Following presentation of the mentoring research model, suggestions are given for types of research studies to identify the operation of key processes before, during, and after mentoring interactions. We conclude with implications of this integrated perspective for theory development and educational practice.

Keywords

Mentoring Self-regulated learning Internalization Co-regulation Socially shared regulation Social cognitive theory Mentor relationship theory 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Teacher Education and Higher EducationThe University of North Carolina at GreensboroGreensboroUSA
  2. 2.School of EducationVirginia TechBlacksburgUSA

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