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Ecotoxicology

, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 370–382 | Cite as

Validation of the OECD reproduction test guideline with the New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum using trenbolone and prochloraz

  • Cornelia GeißEmail author
  • Katharina Ruppert
  • Clare Askem
  • Carlos Barroso
  • Daniel Faber
  • Virginie Ducrot
  • Henrik Holbech
  • Thomas H. Hutchinson
  • Paula Kajankari
  • Karin Lund Kinnberg
  • Laurent Lagadic
  • Peter Matthiessen
  • Steve Morris
  • Maurine Neiman
  • Olli-Pekka Penttinen
  • Paula Sanchez-Marin
  • Matthias Teigeler
  • Lennart Weltje
  • Jörg Oehlmann
Article

Abstract

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) provides several standard test methods for the environmental hazard assessment of chemicals, mainly based on primary producers, arthropods, and fish. In April 2016, two new test guidelines with two mollusc species representing different reproductive strategies were approved by OECD member countries. One test guideline describes a 28-day reproduction test with the parthenogenetic New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum. The main endpoint of the test is reproduction, reflected by the embryo number in the brood pouch per female. The development of a new OECD test guideline involves several phases including inter-laboratory validation studies to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed test design and the reproducibility of the test results. Therefore, a ring test of the reproduction test with P. antipodarum was conducted including eight laboratories with the test substances trenbolone and prochloraz and results are presented here. Most laboratories could meet test validity criteria, thus demonstrating the robustness of the proposed test protocol. Trenbolone did not have an effect on the reproduction of the snails at the tested concentration range (nominal: 10–1000 ng/L). For prochloraz, laboratories produced similar EC10 and NOEC values, showing the inter-laboratory reproducibility of results. The average EC10 and NOEC values for reproduction (with coefficient of variation) were 26.2 µg/L (61.7%) and 29.7 µg/L (32.9%), respectively. This ring test shows that the mudsnail reproduction test is a well-suited tool for use in the chronic aquatic hazard and risk assessment of chemicals.

Keywords

Standardisation Mollusc Gastropod Endocrine disruption Toxicity Fecundity 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to the German Environment Agency (project code 371165417), the United Kingdom’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the Danish Ministry of the Environment and the Spanish Government (project code CTM2013-48194-C3-3-R) for the financial support and to all the laboratories that used their own funds. We would like to thank all participating laboratories for their dedicated work so that the project could be successfully carried out. Furthermore, we thank Bente Frost Holbech (University of Southern Denmark) for performing the chemical analysis within this project. This study was funded by the German Environment Agency (project code 371165417), the United Kingdom’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the Danish Ministry of the Environment and the Spanish Government (project code CTM2013-48194-C3-3-R).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Some of the authors are employed by industry as disclosed in the affiliations of the authors. The test method described here could potentially be used in the future for the environmental risk assessment of chemicals that are produced by industries.

Ethical Approval

All applicable international, national, and/or institutional guidelines for the care and use of animals were followed.

Supplementary material

10646_2017_1770_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (278 kb)
Supplementary Information

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cornelia Geiß
    • 1
    Email author
  • Katharina Ruppert
    • 1
  • Clare Askem
    • 2
  • Carlos Barroso
    • 3
  • Daniel Faber
    • 4
  • Virginie Ducrot
    • 5
  • Henrik Holbech
    • 6
  • Thomas H. Hutchinson
    • 7
  • Paula Kajankari
    • 8
  • Karin Lund Kinnberg
    • 6
  • Laurent Lagadic
    • 5
  • Peter Matthiessen
    • 9
  • Steve Morris
    • 2
  • Maurine Neiman
    • 10
  • Olli-Pekka Penttinen
    • 8
  • Paula Sanchez-Marin
    • 3
    • 11
  • Matthias Teigeler
    • 12
  • Lennart Weltje
    • 13
  • Jörg Oehlmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department Aquatic EcotoxicologyGoethe University Frankfurt am MainFrankfurt am MainGermany
  2. 2.Centre for Environment Fisheries and Aquaculture Science Lowestoft LaboratoryLowestoftUK
  3. 3.Department of Biology and CESAMUniversity of AveiroAveiroPortugal
  4. 4.Bayer CropScience AG, Environmental Safety/EcotoxicologyMonheim am RheinGermany
  5. 5.INRA, UMR Ecologie et Santé des Ecosystèmes, Agrocampus OuestRennes CedexFrance
  6. 6.Department of BiologyUniversity of Southern DenmarkOdense MDenmark
  7. 7.University of PlymouthPlymouthUK
  8. 8.Department of Environmental SciencesUniversity of HelsinkiLahtiFinland
  9. 9.Old School House, Brow Edge, Backbarrow, UlverstonCumbriaUK
  10. 10.Department of BiologyUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA
  11. 11.University of Vigo, ECIMATGaliciaSpain
  12. 12.Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied EcologySchmallenbergGermany
  13. 13.BASF SE, Crop Protection - EcotoxicologyLimburgerhofGermany

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