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Ecotoxicology

, Volume 15, Issue 6, pp 531–538 | Cite as

Venom yields from Australian and some other species of snakes

  • Peter J. Mirtschin
  • Nathan Dunstan
  • Ben Hough
  • Ewan Hamilton
  • Sharna Klein
  • Jonathan Lucas
  • David Millar
  • Frank Madaras
  • Timothy Nias
Article

Abstract

The wet and dry venom yields for most Australian native dangerous snakes and a number of non-Australian species are presented. Snakes from the Pseudonaja genus yielded higher than previously published amounts and suggest reconsideration be given to increasing the volume of antivenom in each vial. Higher percentage solids were obtained from venoms from the 4 cobra species (Naja) and Pseudechis genus included in this series.

Keywords

Venom Yield Snake 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter J. Mirtschin
    • 1
  • Nathan Dunstan
    • 1
  • Ben Hough
    • 1
  • Ewan Hamilton
    • 1
  • Sharna Klein
    • 1
  • Jonathan Lucas
    • 1
  • David Millar
    • 1
  • Frank Madaras
    • 1
  • Timothy Nias
    • 2
  1. 1.Venom Supplies Pty LtdTanundaAustralia
  2. 2.KariongAustralia

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