Environmental Biology of Fishes

, Volume 93, Issue 4, pp 475–481 | Cite as

Movements of lumpsucker females in a northern Norwegian fjord during the spawning season

  • Hiromichi Mitamura
  • Eva B. Thorstad
  • Ingebrigt Uglem
  • Pål Arne Bjørn
  • Finn Økland
  • Tor F. Næsje
  • Tim Dempster
  • Nobuaki Arai
Article

Abstract

The lumpsucker Cyclopterus lumpus is distributed throughout the North Atlantic Ocean and migrates considerable distances between offshore feeding areas and shallow inshore spawning grounds. The number of the lumpsucker has declined since the mid 1980s, probably as a result of overexploitation. The lumpsucker is the preferred host of the sea louse Caligus elongates, which is a problem for marine aquaculture. However, little is known about the biology of the lumpsucker. The aims of the study were to 1) examine the movements of female lumpsucker during the spawning migration, and 2) assess the potential for lumpsucker to act as a vector for transmission of parasites and diseases between aquaculture farms and wild fish. Twenty female lumpsuckers tagged with acoustic transmitters were released during the spawning season in the inner part of Øksfjord, northern Norway and their distribution was recorded by 22 automatic acoustic receivers. The average time until departure from the fjord was 3 days, and within 1 week all fish had left the fjord. Timing of departure from the fjord was unrelated with either tidal current patterns or the time of the day. A high proportion of the fish (75%) were recorded within 200 m of fish farms, but they did not stay for extended periods at these farms. Our results suggest that mature female lumpsucker exhibit a movement pattern characterized by rapid fjord-scale migrations during the spawning season, and that they are not attracted to salmon farms in the same way as a range of other fish species.

Keywords

Cyclopterus lumpus Lumpfish Management Øksfjord Spawning migration Telemetry 

References

  1. Bjordal Å, Skar AB (1992) Tagging of saithe (Pollachius virens L.) at a Norwegian fish farm: preliminary results on migration. ICES Council Meeting Papers 1992/G:35Google Scholar
  2. Collins MAJ (1976) The lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus L.) in Newfoundland waters. Can Field-Nat 90:64–67Google Scholar
  3. Davenport J (1985) Synopsis of biological data on the lumpsucker Cyclopterus lumpus (Linnaeus, 1958). FAO Fisheries Synopsis no. 147, 31 ppGoogle Scholar
  4. Davenport J, Thorsteinsson V (1989) Observations on the colours of lumpsuckers, Cyclopterus lumpus L. J Fish Biol 35:829–838CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Dempster T, Uglem I, Sanchez-Jerez P, Fernandez-Jover D, Bayle-Sempere J, Nilsen R, Bjørn PA (2009) Coastal salmon farms attract large and persistent aggregations of wild fish: an ecosystem effect. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 385:1–14CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Forward RB, Tankersley RA (2001) Selective tidal-stream transport of marine animals. Oceanogr Mar Biol Annual Rev 39:305–353Google Scholar
  7. Goulet D, Green JM, Shears TH (1986) Courtship, spawning, and parental care behaviour of the lumpfish, Cyclopterus lumpus L., in Newfoundland. Can J Zool 64:1320–1325CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Heuch PA, Øines Ø, Knutsen JA, Schram TA (2007) Infection of wild fishes by the parasitic copepod Caligus elongates on the south east coast of Norway. Dis Aquat Org 77:149–158PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Jepsen N, Thorstad EB, Baras E, Koed A (2002) Surgical implantation of telemetry transmitters in fish: how much have we learned? Hydrobiologia 483:239–248CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Kabata Z (1979) Parasitic Copepoda of British fishes. The Ray Society, LondonGoogle Scholar
  11. McCleave JD, Arnold GP (1999) Movements of yellow- and silver-phase European eels (Anguilla anguilla L.) tracked in the western North Sea. ICES J Mar Sci 56:510–536CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. McKenzie E, Gettinby G, McCart K, Revie CW (2004) Time-series models of sea lice Caligus elongatus (Nordmann) abundance on Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. in Loch Sunart, Scotland. Aquacul Res 35:764–772CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Mochek AD (1973) Spawning behaviour of the lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.). J Ichtyol 13:615–619Google Scholar
  14. Øines Ø, Heuch PA (2007) Caligus elongatus Nordmann genotypes on wild and farmed fish. J Fish Dis 30:81–91PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Øines Ø, Simonsen JH, Knutsen JA, Heuch PA (2006) Host preference of adult Caligus elongatus Nordmann in the laboratory and its implications for Atlantic cod aquaculture. J Fish Dis 29:167–174PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Peake S, McKinley RS, Scruton DA, Moccia R (1997) Influence of transmitter attachment procedures on swimming performance of wild and hatchery-reared Atlantic salmon smolts. Trans Am Fish Soc 126:707–714CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Pike AW, Wadsworth SL (1999) Sealice on salmonids; their biology and control. Adv Parasitol 44:233–337PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Schopka SA (1974) Preliminary results from tagging of lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus) in Icelandic waters 1971–3. ICES C.M. 1974/F: 18, 24 pp. (mimeo)Google Scholar
  19. Sunnanå K (2007) Rognkjeks. Kyst og Havbruk pp. 86–87. (In Norwegian)Google Scholar
  20. Thoreau X, Baras E (1997) Evaluation of surgery procedures for implanting telemetry transmitters into the body cavity of tilapia Oreochromis auretus. Aquat - Living Resour 10:207–211CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Uglem I, Bjørn P-A, Dale T, Kerwath S, Økland F, Nilsen R, Aas K, Fleming I, McKinley RS (2008) Movements and spatiotemporal distribution of escaped farmed and local wild Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.). Aquacul Res 39:158–170CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Uglem I, Dempster T, Bjørn P-A, Sanchez-Jerez P, Økland F (2009) High connectivity of salmon farms revealed by aggregation, residence and repeated migrations of wild fish among farms. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 384:251–260CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiromichi Mitamura
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eva B. Thorstad
    • 2
  • Ingebrigt Uglem
    • 2
  • Pål Arne Bjørn
    • 3
  • Finn Økland
    • 2
  • Tor F. Næsje
    • 2
  • Tim Dempster
    • 4
    • 5
  • Nobuaki Arai
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of InformaticsKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Norwegian Institute for Nature ResearchTrondheimNorway
  3. 3.Norwegian Institute of Fisheries and Aquaculture ResearchTromsøNorway
  4. 4.SINTEF Fisheries and AquacultureTrondheimNorway
  5. 5.Department of ZoologyUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

Personalised recommendations