Environmental and Resource Economics

, Volume 62, Issue 4, pp 811–836

The Stability and Effectiveness of Climate Coalitions

A Comparative Analysis of Multiple Integrated Assessment Models
  • Kai Lessmann
  • Ulrike Kornek
  • Valentina Bosetti
  • Rob Dellink
  • Johannes Emmerling
  • Johan Eyckmans
  • Miyuki Nagashima
  • Hans-Peter Weikard
  • Zili Yang
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10640-015-9886-0

Cite this article as:
Lessmann, K., Kornek, U., Bosetti, V. et al. Environ Resource Econ (2015) 62: 811. doi:10.1007/s10640-015-9886-0

Abstract

We report results from a comparison of numerically calibrated game theoretic integrated assessment models that explore the stability and performance of international coalitions for climate change mitigation. We identify robust results concerning the incentives of different nations to commit themselves to a climate agreement and estimate the extent of greenhouse gas mitigation that can be achieved by stable agreements. We also assess the potential of transfers that redistribute the surplus of cooperation to foster the stability of climate coalitions. In contrast to much of the existing analytical game theoretical literature, we find substantial scope for self-enforcing climate coalitions in most models that close much of the abatement and welfare gap between complete absence of cooperation and full cooperation. This more positive message follows from the use of appropriate transfer schemes that are designed to counteract free riding incentives.

Keywords

Coalition stability International environmental agreements  Numerical modeling Transfers 

Supplementary material

10640_2015_9886_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (215 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (pdf 216 KB)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kai Lessmann
    • 1
  • Ulrike Kornek
    • 1
  • Valentina Bosetti
    • 2
  • Rob Dellink
    • 3
  • Johannes Emmerling
    • 4
  • Johan Eyckmans
    • 5
  • Miyuki Nagashima
    • 6
  • Hans-Peter Weikard
    • 3
  • Zili Yang
    • 7
  1. 1.Potsdam-Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)PotsdamGermany
  2. 2.Department of Economis, IEFE, and IGIERUniversita Bocconi and Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM)MilanItaly
  3. 3.Environmental Economics and Natural Resources Group, Department of EconomicsWageningen UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM) and Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC)MilanItaly
  5. 5.Center for Economics and Corporate Sustainability (CEDON)KU LeuvenBrusselsBelgium
  6. 6.Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth (RITE)KyotoJapan
  7. 7.Department of EconomicsState University of New York at BinghamtonNew YorkUSA

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