Environmental and Resource Economics

, Volume 44, Issue 4, pp 571–590 | Cite as

GIS-Based Hedonic Pricing of Landscape

  • Jean Cavailhès
  • Thierry Brossard
  • Jean-Christophe Foltête
  • Mohamed Hilal
  • Daniel Joly
  • François-Pierre Tourneux
  • Céline Tritz
  • Pierre Wavresky
Article

Abstract

Hedonic prices of landscape are estimated in the urban fringe of Dijon (France). Viewshed and its content as perceived at ground level are analyzed from satellite images supplemented by a digital elevation model. Landscape attributes are then fed into econometric models (based on 2,667 house sales) that allows for endogeneity, multicollinearity, and spatial correlations. Results show that when in the line of sight, trees and farmland in the immediate vicinity of houses command positive prices and roads negative prices; if out of sight, their prices are markedly lower or insignificant: the view itself matters. The layout of features in fragmented landscapes commands positive hedonic prices. Landscapes and features in sight but more than 100–300~m away all have insignificant prices.

Keywords

Amenity Hedonic pricing Landscape View 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean Cavailhès
    • 1
  • Thierry Brossard
    • 2
  • Jean-Christophe Foltête
    • 2
  • Mohamed Hilal
    • 3
  • Daniel Joly
    • 2
  • François-Pierre Tourneux
    • 2
  • Céline Tritz
    • 2
  • Pierre Wavresky
    • 3
  1. 1.CESAER-INRADijon CedexFrance
  2. 2.CNRS-ThéMABesançonFrance
  3. 3.INRA-CESAERDijon CedexFrance

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