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Investigational New Drugs

, Volume 36, Issue 3, pp 416–423 | Cite as

Phase I study of the combination of crizotinib (as a MET inhibitor) and dasatinib (as a c-SRC inhibitor) in patients with advanced cancer

  • Shumei Kato
  • Denis L. Jardim
  • Faye M. Johnson
  • Vivek Subbiah
  • Sarina Piha-Paul
  • Apostolia M. Tsimberidou
  • Gerald S. Falchook
  • Daniel Karp
  • Ralph Zinner
  • Jennifer Wheler
  • Filip Janku
  • Siqing Fu
  • JoAnn Lim
  • Stacie Bean
  • Ly Nguyen
  • Susan Urban
  • Elsa Browne
  • Funda Meric-Bernstam
  • David S. HongEmail author
PHASE I STUDIES

Summary

Background Both MET and c-SRC are important mediators of cancer progression and there is cross talk between the two molecules. Preclinical studies have demonstrated combination of MET and c-SRC inhibitors is effective in multiple cancer types. Methods We analyzed the safety and efficacy of administering a c-SRC inhibitor (dasatinib) in combination with a MET inhibitor (crizotinib) in a two-arm concurrent phase I study. Arm A consisted of crizotinib fixed at 250 mg twice per day with escalation of dasatinib. Arm B consisted of dasatinib fixed at 140 mg daily with escalation of crizotinib. Endpoints included dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), recommended phase II dose (RP2D), and response (RECIST 1.1). Results We enrolled 61 patients (arm A: 31, arm B: 30). The most common cancers were sarcoma (21%) and prostate cancer (16%). In Arm A, at dose level 2 (DL2), 40% (2/5) experienced DLTs. In the expanded DL1, 21% (4/19) experienced DLTs (all grade 3). In Arm B, at DL2, 50% (2/4) experienced DLTs. In the expanded DL1, 22% (4/18) experienced DLTs (all grade 3). RP2D was determined to be arm A, DL1 (250 mg crizotinib orally twice per day plus 50 mg dasatinib orally daily). Partial response (N = 1) and stable disease for ≥6 months (N = 3) were seen. Conclusions The combination of crizotinib and dasatinib is safe to administer but tolerability is limited given the high rate of adverse events. Responses and durable stable disease were limited. Further precision therapy approach using this specific combination may be difficult given the toxicity.

Keywords

Crizotinib Dasatinib Phase I Safety MET c-SRC 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Erica Goodoff from Department of Scientific Publications, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX for reviewing the manuscript.

Funding

Funded by University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer, P30 Cancer Center Support Grant (P30CA016672).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no conflicts of interest to report.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Supplementary material

10637_2017_513_MOESM1_ESM.docx (26 kb)
Supplementary Table 1 (DOCX 28 kb)
10637_2017_513_MOESM2_ESM.docx (28 kb)
Supplementary Table 2 (DOCX 28 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shumei Kato
    • 1
  • Denis L. Jardim
    • 1
  • Faye M. Johnson
    • 2
    • 3
  • Vivek Subbiah
    • 1
  • Sarina Piha-Paul
    • 1
  • Apostolia M. Tsimberidou
    • 1
  • Gerald S. Falchook
    • 1
  • Daniel Karp
    • 1
  • Ralph Zinner
    • 1
  • Jennifer Wheler
    • 1
  • Filip Janku
    • 1
  • Siqing Fu
    • 1
  • JoAnn Lim
    • 1
  • Stacie Bean
    • 1
  • Ly Nguyen
    • 1
  • Susan Urban
    • 1
  • Elsa Browne
    • 1
  • Funda Meric-Bernstam
    • 1
  • David S. Hong
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Investigational Cancer TherapeuticsThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Thoracic/Head & Neck Medical OncologyThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical SciencesHoustonUSA

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