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Investigational New Drugs

, Volume 30, Issue 6, pp 2407–2410 | Cite as

Severe meningo-radiculo-nevritis associated with ipilimumab

  • Flavie Bompaire
  • Christine Mateus
  • Hervé Taillia
  • Thierry De Greslan
  • Marion Lahutte
  • Magali Sallansonnet-Froment
  • Madani Ouologuem
  • Jean-Luc Renard
  • Guy Gorochov
  • Caroline Robert
  • Damien Ricard
SHORT REPORT

Summary

Purpose Ipilimumab is a T-cell-potentiating monoclonal antibody directed against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) to promote antitumoural immunity. In phase III trials, ipilimumab was shown to be the first agent to improve survival in advanced melanoma patients, regardless of previous treatment. We report a case of severe neurologic disease after ipilimumab treatment. Patient and methods Neurologic symptoms including facial diplegia, tetraplegia, areflexia progressed with time a few days after the fourth monthly ipilimumab infusion. Analysis of the cerebro-spinal fluid showed elevated proteinorachy and lymphocytic meningitis. Despite high doses of steroids and symptomatic treatment, the symptoms worsened. Results Veinoglobulins were then infused and the patient began to improve and recovered almost normal activity two years later. Conclusion The adverse event profile associated with ipilimumab was primarily immune-related. This is the first case in which such a severe event has been reported.

Keywords

Lyme Disease Ipilimumab Guillain Barre Syndrome Efalizumab Superficial Spreading Melanoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Conflict of interest

Caroline Robert declares consulting activities for Bristol-Myers Squibb.

The other authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.x

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Flavie Bompaire
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christine Mateus
    • 4
  • Hervé Taillia
    • 1
    • 2
  • Thierry De Greslan
    • 1
  • Marion Lahutte
    • 3
  • Magali Sallansonnet-Froment
    • 1
  • Madani Ouologuem
    • 1
  • Jean-Luc Renard
    • 1
  • Guy Gorochov
    • 6
    • 8
  • Caroline Robert
    • 4
    • 5
  • Damien Ricard
    • 1
    • 2
    • 7
  1. 1.Service de neurologieHôpital d’instruction des armées du Val de Grâce, Service de santé des ArméesParisFrance
  2. 2.Ecole du Val de Grâce, Service de Santé des ArméesParisFrance
  3. 3.Service de radiologieHôpital d’instruction des armées du Val de Grâce, Service de santé des ArméesParisFrance
  4. 4.Service de dermatologie, département d’oncologie médicaleInstitut Gustave RoussyVillejuifFrance
  5. 5.INSERM U981Institut Gustave RoussyVillejuifFrance
  6. 6.Laboratoire d’ImmunologieHôpital de la Pitié SalpêtrièreParisFrance
  7. 7.Service de neurologie HIA du Val de GrâceParisFrance
  8. 8.Université Pierre et Marie CurieParisFrance

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