Documenta Ophthalmologica

, Volume 116, Issue 2, pp 91–95 | Cite as

Annular fundus autofluorescence abnormality in a case of macular dystrophy

  • Charlotte M. Poloschek
  • Lutz L. Hansen
  • Michael Bach
Original Research Article

Abstract

Purpose: To present a case of macular dystrophy with early changes in fundus autofluorescence. Methods: A 20-year-old woman with a recent loss of visual acuity and onset of photophobia was examined. Color vision and visual field testing, fluorescein angiography, full-field and multifocal electroretinograms as well as fundus autofluorescence were performed. Results: Best-corrected visual acuity was 20/100 (right eye) and 20/60 (left eye). There was a red-green color vision defect and a relative central scotoma in both eyes. Ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography were essentially normal, the presence of a dark choroid was debatable. Full-field ERG responses were normal, but the multifocal ERG showed severely reduced responses in the macular region. Both eyes showed a slight circular parafoveolar increase of fundus autofluorescence. Conclusion: Besides multifocal ERG, fundus autofluorescence aids to objectively assess the manifestation of macular dystrophies but does not discern between different types in early stages.

Keywords

Fundus autofluorescence Central cone dystrophy Full-field electroretinogram Hereditary retinal dystrophy Macular dystrophy Occult macular dystrophy Multifocal electroretinogram Stargardt macular dystrophy-fundus flavimaculatus 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charlotte M. Poloschek
    • 1
  • Lutz L. Hansen
    • 1
  • Michael Bach
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyUniversity of FreiburgFreiburgGermany

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