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Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 63, Issue 9, pp 2480–2481 | Cite as

Alterations in Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Metabolism and Reduced Serum Eicosadienoic Acid Level in Ulcerative Colitis: Is There a Place for Metabolomic Fatty Acid Biomarkers in IBD?

  • Stanislav Sitkin
  • Juris Pokrotnieks
Correspondence
  • 100 Downloads

To the Editors,

We read with great interest the article by Nishiumi et al. [1], which reported altered levels of some metabolites, including polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and lipid mediators, and high colonic and plasma levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in IL-10 knockout mice. This and some earlier studies have shown that alterations in serum/plasma levels of ω-6 and ω-3 PUFAs seem to be associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In particular, PUFA levels show correlations with proinflammatory cytokines deeply involved in the pathogenesis of IBD [2, 3].

Recently, we also performed a pilot comparative metabolomic study among patients with mild-to-moderate active ulcerative colitis (UC; n = 40) and healthy controls (HCs; n = 42) with an emphasis on the determination of serum free fatty acids by using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry [4]. We identified significant changes in the serum metabolome of UC patients, reflecting pathway disturbances in glycolysis, the...

Notes

Author’s contributions

All authors drafted and critically revised the manuscript, and approved the final version.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

References

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Internal Diseases, Gastroenterology and DieteticsNorth-Western State Medical University named after I.I. MechnikovSt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.Department of Internal DiseasesRīga Stradiņš UniversityRigaLatvia
  3. 3.Centre of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and NutritionPauls Stradiņš Clinical University HospitalRigaLatvia

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