Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 58, Issue 12, pp 3400–3406

Health Care Costs of Complex Perianal Fistula in Crohn’s Disease

  • M. Chaparro
  • C. Zanotti
  • P. Burgueño
  • I. Vera
  • F. Bermejo
  • I. Marín-Jiménez
  • C. Yela
  • P. López
  • M. D. Martín
  • C. Taxonera
  • B. Botella
  • R. Pajares
  • A. Ponferrada
  • M. Calvo
  • A. Algaba
  • L. Pérez
  • B. Casis
  • J. Maté
  • J. Orofino
  • N. Lara
  • M. García-Losa
  • X. Badia
  • J. P. Gisbert
Original Article

Abstract

Aim

To evaluate the use of health care resources and the associated costs of complex perianal Crohn’s disease (CD) from the National Health System perspective.

Methods

We conducted a multicenter, retrospective, observational study in which gastroenterologists from 11 hospitals in the Community of Madrid took part. Data was collected on the direct healthcare resources (pharmacological treatments, surgical procedures, laboratory/diagnostic tests, visits to specialists and emergency departments, and hospitalizations) consumed by 97 adult patients with complex perianal CD which was active at some point between January 1, 2005, and case history review.

Results

We recorded 527 treatments: 73.1 % pharmacological (32.3 % antibiotic, 20.5 % immunomodulator, 20.3 % biological) and 26.9 % surgical. Mean annual global cost was €8,289/patient, 75.3 % (€6,242) of which was accounted for by pharmacological treatments (€13.44 antibiotics; €1,136 immunomodulators; €5,093 biological agents), 12.4 % (€1,027) by hospitalizations and surgery, 7.7 % (€640) by medical visits, 4.2 % (€350) by laboratory/diagnostic tests, and 0.4 % (€30) by emergency department visits.

Conclusions

Pharmacological therapies, and in particular biological agents, are the main cost driver in complex perianal CD; costs due to surgery and hospitalizations are much lower.

Keywords

Perianal Crohn’s disease Complex fistulas Costs Health resources 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Chaparro
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Zanotti
    • 3
  • P. Burgueño
    • 1
  • I. Vera
    • 4
  • F. Bermejo
    • 5
  • I. Marín-Jiménez
    • 6
  • C. Yela
    • 7
  • P. López
    • 8
  • M. D. Martín
    • 9
  • C. Taxonera
    • 10
    • 11
  • B. Botella
    • 12
  • R. Pajares
    • 13
  • A. Ponferrada
    • 14
  • M. Calvo
    • 4
  • A. Algaba
    • 5
  • L. Pérez
    • 6
  • B. Casis
    • 7
  • J. Maté
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Orofino
    • 3
  • N. Lara
    • 15
  • M. García-Losa
    • 15
  • X. Badia
    • 15
  • J. P. Gisbert
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Servicio de Aparato Digestivo del Hospital Universitario de La PrincesaInstituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa (IP)Boadilla del Monte, MadridSpain
  2. 2.Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD)MadridSpain
  3. 3.Cellerix, S.A.MadridSpain
  4. 4.Servicio de Aparato Digestivo del Hospital Puerta de HierroMadridSpain
  5. 5.Servicio de Aparato Digestivo del Hospital Universitario de FuenlabradaMadridSpain
  6. 6.Servicio de Aparato Digestivo del Hospital Gregorio MarañónMadridSpain
  7. 7.Servicio de Aparato Digestivo del Hospital Doce de OctubreMadridSpain
  8. 8.Servicio de Aparato Digestivo del Hospital de AlcorcónMadridSpain
  9. 9.Servicio de Aparato Digestivo del Hospital de La PazMadridSpain
  10. 10.Servicio de Aparato Digestivo del Hospital Clínico San CarlosMadridSpain
  11. 11.Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos (IdISSC)MadridSpain
  12. 12.Servicio de Aparato Digestivo del Hospital de Infanta CristinaMadridSpain
  13. 13.Servicio de Aparato Digestivo del Hospital de Infanta SofíaMadridSpain
  14. 14.Servicio de Aparato Digestivo del Hospital de Infanta LeonorMadridSpain
  15. 15.IMS HealthBarcelonaSpain

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