Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 53, Issue 8, pp 2156–2159 | Cite as

Response to Hepatitis B Vaccination in Patients with Celiac Disease

  • Emel Ahishali
  • Gungor Boztas
  • Filiz Akyuz
  • Duygu Ibrisim
  • Sule Poturoglu
  • Binnur Pinarbasi
  • Sadakat Ozdil
  • Zeynel Mungan
Original Paper

Abstract

Abnormal immune response to gliadin, genetic, and environmental factors play a role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease (CD). Non-responsiveness to hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination is related to genetic features. Certain human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes are more prevalent among non-responders to HBV vaccination. There is also a strong relationship between CD and these HLA genotypes. This study investigates the relationship between CD and non-responsiveness to HBV vaccination, with an emphasis on genotypic co-incidence. No statistically significant difference was noted between the ages and gender of CD patients and control subjects. Baseline serum IgA, IgM, and IgG levels of all CD patients were normal. Responsiveness to HBV vaccination was observed in 17 (68%) CD patients and all (100%) control subjects (P = 0.006). In conclusion, CD should also be sought in unresponders to HBV vaccine who are not immunosuppressed.

Keywords

Celiac disease Hepatitis B Vaccination 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emel Ahishali
    • 1
  • Gungor Boztas
    • 1
  • Filiz Akyuz
    • 1
  • Duygu Ibrisim
    • 1
  • Sule Poturoglu
    • 1
  • Binnur Pinarbasi
    • 1
  • Sadakat Ozdil
    • 1
  • Zeynel Mungan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Gastroenterohepatology, Istanbul Faculty of MedicineIstanbul UniversityIstanbulTurkey

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