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Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery

, Volume 30, Issue 5, pp 1217–1248 | Cite as

Locating the contagion source in networks with partial timestamps

  • Kai ZhuEmail author
  • Zhen Chen
  • Lei Ying
Article

Abstract

This paper studies the problem of identifying a single contagion source when partial timestamps of a contagion process are available. We formulate the source localization problem as a ranking problem on graphs, where infected nodes are ranked according to their likelihood of being the source. Two ranking algorithms, cost-based ranking and tree-based ranking, are proposed in this paper. Experimental evaluations with synthetic and real-world data show that our algorithms significantly improve the ranking accuracy compared with four existing algorithms.

Keywords

Contagion process Information source localization Partial timestamps Ranking on graphs 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory’s Army Research Office (ARO Grant No. W911NF1310279).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Electrical, Computer and Energy EngineeringArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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