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Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 39, Issue 1, pp 39–49 | Cite as

An Examination of the Historical and Current Perceptions of Love in the Psychotherapeutic Dyad

  • Danna BodenheimerEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Since the initial dialogues on the treatment relationship began, a hierarchical structure of our profession was set forth. This was largely created by Sigmund Freud, often considered the initiator of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. Our profession was characterized by a neutral, distant practitioner who performed his work upon an unknowing patient. The reality of the multiple complexities of this relationship has become clearer over time. This paper seeks to examine the steps that have taken us from the initially distant and non-mutual psychotherapeutic relationship to the more egalitarian and co-created format that many clinicians are working in today. Love, in both its absence and presence, is examined as a central concept and tenet of psychotherapy.

Keywords

Love Countransference Relational Intersubjective Hate Ferenczi 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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