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Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 155–162 | Cite as

Winnicott, Tomkins, and the Psychology of Affect

  • Paul C. Holinger
Original Paper

Abstract

Donald Winnicott’s work is rather well-known to most clinicians, and many of his concepts––e.g., facilitating environment, spontaneous gesture, going-on-being, impingement, annihilation, True and False Self––are utilized clinically and theoretically. Silvan Tomkins and his colleagues provide a profound understanding of the psychology of affect, and their work furnishes a lens through which Winnicott’s ideas can be further appreciated. The author suggests such an integration is crucial not only to deepening our understanding of Winnicott’s concepts, but also to enhancing the clinical dimension of affect theory. This discussion also has important implications for social work with respect to both treatment issues as well as prevention and early intervention programs.

Keywords

Winnicott Tomkins True self False self Impingement Spontaneous gesture Facilitating environment Play Affect 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Chicago Institute for PsychoanalysisRush University Medical Center, ChicagoChicagoUSA

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