Gertrude and Rubin Blanck: Their Contributions to the Theory and Practice of Clinical Social Work and to the Body of Psychoanalytic Knowledge

Original Paper

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.New York School for the Study of Psychotherapy and PsychoanalysisMerrickUSA
  2. 2.New York School for the Study of Psychotherapy and PsychoanalysisNew YorkUSA

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