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Critical Criminology

, 16:229 | Cite as

Expanding the Intersectional Paradigm to Better Understand Domestic Violence in Immigrant Communities

  • Natalie J. SokoloffEmail author
Article

Abstract

The study of battered women of color marginalized by their race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, class, and immigrant status (defined as an intersectional approach) has created new ways of thinking of and dealing with domestic violence in immigrant communities. This article applies the principles of an intersectional and interlocking analysis to the experiences of battered immigrant women in the U.S. In addition, here I bring together another dimension of intersectionality: one that inter-relates certain dynamics of domestic violence specific to immigrant communities and some of the unique ways in which immigrant communities are dealing with domestic violence in the U.S. In these ways, we are better able to see both the concerns about displacement and marginalization, as well as contestation and empowerment of battered immigrant women.

Keywords

Domestic Violence Criminal Justice System Immigrant Woman Battered Woman Immigrant Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

I am grateful to Margaret Abraham, Hoan Bui, and Shamita Das Dasgupta for their thoughtful comments, invaluable insights, and continual support of my work. For making this work more readable, I thank Fred L. Pincus and Susan C. Pearce for their insights and editorial skills.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sociology DepartmentJohn Jay College of Criminal Justice—City University of New YorkNYUSA

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