Crime, Law and Social Change

, Volume 50, Issue 1–2, pp 25–46

Terror in the courts: Beginning to assess the impact of terrorism-related prosecutions on domestic criminal law and procedure in the USA

Article

Abstract

This article explores some of the possible influences of the “war on terror.” It asks whether civilian criminal prosecutions of terrorism-related offenses or suspects may shape or distort domestic criminal law and procedure in the USA. The article identifies issues that may tend to arise in terrorism-related cases and suggests categories of prosecutions that may be more or less likely to influence the development of domestic law. It ends with several specific suggestions for further research.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of California, Berkeley, School of LawBerkeleyUSA

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