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European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 191–205 | Cite as

Official Crime Statistics and Survey Data: Comparing Trends of Youth Violence between 2000 and 2006 in Cities of the Czech Republic, Germany, Poland, Russia, and Slovenia

  • Dirk EnzmannEmail author
  • Zuzana Podana
Article

Abstract

Based on official crime statistics, violent crimes of youths in Germany and Central and Eastern Europe had appeared to have increased considerably between 1990 and 2000. Survey data that can overcome limitations of police data and allow to compare crime trends across countries are rare. Based on self-report delinquency studies of 15 year old juveniles in 1998–2001 (SRD) and 2006 (ISRD-2) using compatible questionnaires in Germany and Central and Eastern Europe (partly in the same cities), trends of attitudes towards violence, of victimisation experiences and self-reported wanton and instrumental violence are compared cross-nationally. There is substantially less approval of violence in 2006 and a corresponding decrease of victimisation experiences and violent behaviour between 1999 and 2006. Official crime statistics show serious limitations. The results are discussed with respect to theories of modernisation and social change.

Keywords

Juvenile delinquency Robbery Assault Attitudes towards violence Behaviour change Cross-national comparison 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Criminal SciencesUniversity of HamburgHamburgGermany
  2. 2.Department of SociologyCharles University PraguePrague 1Czech Republic

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