Constraints

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 31–51 | Cite as

On Topological Consistency and Realization

Article

Abstract

Topological relations are important in various tasks of spatial reasoning, scene description and object recognition. The RCC8 spatial constraint language developed by Randell, Cui and Cohn is widely recognized as of particular importance in both the research fields of qualitative spatial reasoning (QSR) and geographical information science. Given a network of RCC8 relations, naturally we ask when it is consistent, and if this is the case, can we have a realization in a certain spatial model? This paper gives a direct and simple algorithm for generating realizations of path-consistent networks of RCC8 base relations. As a result, we also show that each consistent network of RCC8 relations has a realization in the digital plane (with either 4- or 8-connections) and in any RCC model.

Keywords

Qualitative spatial reasoning Region Connection Calculus RCC8 constraint language Realization Consistency Path-consistency 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Intelligent Technology and Systems, Department of Computer Science and TechnologyTsinghua UniversityBeijingChina

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