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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 55, Issue 4, pp 714–715 | Cite as

Lipid Composition of Cirsium setosum

  • I. G. NikolaevaEmail author
  • L. P. Tsybiktarova
  • V. V. Taraskin
  • L. D. Radnaeva
  • Zh. A. Tykheev
  • G. G. Nikolaeva
Article
  • 7 Downloads

Cirsium setosum (Willd.) M. Bieb. (Asteraceae) is a perennial herbaceous thistle indigenous to Europe, Western and Eastern Siberia, the Far East, Mongolia, China, Japan, Caucasus, Sakhalin, Central Asia, and the Arctic [1, 2, 3, 4]. Decoction of the herb is used in folk medicine for colic and topically for diatheses, eczema, and various types of dermatitis. Juice of leaves and young plants possesses wound-healing and anti-inflammatory activity. Tincture and decoction of all plant parts are used for nervous disorders [4]. Preparations of the aerial part of the plant were used experimentally for neoplasms of the stomach and lungs [4, 5]. The charred dried aerial part is used in Chinese medicine [6]. The lipid composition of the plant has not been previously studied.

The aerial part of C. setosumcollected during flowering (July 2018) and subterranean plant organs collected during wilting (September, 2018) in Ivolginsky District, Republic of Buryatia, were studied. The lipid contents of...

Notes

Acknowledgment

The work was performed in the framework of State Tasks No. AAAA-A17-117011810037-0 and No. AAAA-A17-117021310252-1.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. G. Nikolaeva
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • L. P. Tsybiktarova
    • 2
  • V. V. Taraskin
    • 2
    • 3
  • L. D. Radnaeva
    • 2
    • 3
  • Zh. A. Tykheev
    • 2
    • 3
  • G. G. Nikolaeva
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of General and Experimental Biology, Siberian BranchRussian Academy of SciencesUlan-UdeRussia
  2. 2.Buryat State UniversityUlan-UdeRussia
  3. 3.Baikal Institute of Nature Management, Siberian BranchRussian Academy of SciencesUlan-UdeRussia

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