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A New Nonglycosidic Iridoid from Aerial Parts of Gelsemium elegans

  • Bai Bai
  • Shi-yi Peng
  • Qin Liu
  • Juan Shen
  • Long-ping Zhu
  • Dong-mei Wang
  • De-po YangEmail author
  • Zhi-min ZhaoEmail author
Article
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A new nonglycosidic iridoid, geleganoid G (1), together with six previously reported analogues (2–7), were isolated from the aqueous ethanol extract of the aerial parts of Gelsemium elegans. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses and comparison with data from the literature. It is proved that 1 is a new compound by using LC-ESI-MS. All compounds were evaluated for inhibition of LPS-induced NO release in RAW 264.7 cells in vitro. Only compound 3 displayed moderate inhibition of NO release.

Keywords

Gelsemium elegans nonglycosidic iridoid Loganiaceae LPS-induced NO inhibitory activity 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was financially supported by the Industry-University-Research Cooperation Program from the Science and Technology Department of Guangdong Province (No. 2013B090500100).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bai Bai
    • 1
  • Shi-yi Peng
    • 1
  • Qin Liu
    • 1
  • Juan Shen
    • 1
  • Long-ping Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dong-mei Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • De-po Yang
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Zhi-min Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.School of Pharmaceutical SciencesSun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouP. R. China
  2. 2.Guangdong Technology Research Center for Advanced Chinese MedicineGuangzhouP. R. China

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