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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 54, Issue 5, pp 959–960 | Cite as

Fatty Acids from Fritillaria pallidiflora and Their Biological Activity

  • Q. Dong
  • H. Yimamu
  • P. Rozi
  • M. Bakri
  • A. Wali
  • A. Abuduwaili
  • A. Yili
  • H. A. Aisa
Article
  • 13 Downloads

The perennial herbaceous plant Fritillaria pallidiflora Schrenk (Liliaceae) is distributed mainly in Xinjiang Province of the PRC. Bulbs of F. pallidiflora have been used in folk medicine for a long time as antiasthmatic, anticough, and cholegogic agents [1]. Previously, isosteroidal alkaloids, glycosides, coumarins, and terpenoids were isolated from the plant [2, 3, 4].

Herein, results from gas-chromatography–mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) studies of the fatty-acid composition of dry bulbs of F. pallidiflora are reported for the first time. Dried and ground bulbs (100 g) were extracted with petroleum ether (500 mL) at 80°C in a Soxhlet apparatus. The solvent was evaporated to afford the final residue (1.04 g).

IR spectra of the petroleum-ether extract of F. pallidiflora showed characteristic absorption bands in the ranges 3000–3416 (OH), 2920 and 2851 (CH2 and CH3), 1742 and 1646 (C=O), and 1169 and 1049 cm–1 (C–O).

Methylation used the following method. Petroleum-ether extract (100 mg)...

Notes

Acknowledgment

The work was financially supported by a Program of the Chinese National Natural Science Foundation (No. U1403201).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Q. Dong
    • 1
    • 3
  • H. Yimamu
    • 4
  • P. Rozi
    • 1
    • 3
  • M. Bakri
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Wali
    • 1
    • 3
  • A. Abuduwaili
    • 1
    • 3
  • A. Yili
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. A. Aisa
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Plants Resources and Chemistry of Arid Zone, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and ChemistryChinese Academy of SciencesUrumqiP. R. China
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory Basis of Xinjiang Indigenous Medicinal Plants Resource Utilization, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and ChemistryChinese Academy of SciencesUrumqiP. R. China
  3. 3.University of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingP. R. China
  4. 4.Department of PharmacyXinjiang Medical UniversityUrumqiP. R. China

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