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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 51, Issue 5, pp 980–981 | Cite as

Essential Oil Composition of Tordylium elegans

  • Mine Kurkcuoglu
  • Alev Tosun
  • Ahmet Duran
  • Hayri Duman
  • K. Husnu Can Baser
Article
The genus Tordylium L. (Umbelliferae) is represented by 16 species, including six endemic species in Turkey [ 1, 2]. Tordylium elegans (Boiss. & Balansa) Alava & Hub.-Mor. (Syn.: Ainsworthia elegans Boiss. & Balansa), the endemic species, grows in rocky places, fields, and roadsides as an annual plant [ 1]. There are only a few phytochemical and biological activity studies on some Tordylium species. Essential oil studies on Tordylium species are quite scarce [ 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. Thus, in the present study, essential oils from crushed fruits of Tordylium elegans collected from different localities were distilled using an Eppendorf Microdistiller®. The oils were analyzed by GC-FID and GC/MS. The list of compounds identified in the microdistilled oils of Tordylium elegans with their relative percentages, retention indices, and percentage amounts of compound classes are given in Table  1.
Table 1

Composition of the Essential Oils of Tordylium elegans, %

Compound

RRI

A

B

Compound

RRI

A

B

Limonene...

Keywords

Endemic Species Octyl Hexanoate Sample Vial Percentage Amount 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mine Kurkcuoglu
    • 1
  • Alev Tosun
    • 2
  • Ahmet Duran
    • 3
  • Hayri Duman
    • 4
  • K. Husnu Can Baser
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PharmacognosyAnadolu University, Faculty of PharmacyEskisehirTurkey
  2. 2.Department of PharmacognosyAnkara University, Faculty of PharmacyTandoganTurkey
  3. 3.Department of Biology, Faculty of EducationSelcuk UniversityMeramTurkey
  4. 4.Department of BiologyGazi University, Faculty of Science and LettersAnkaraTurkey
  5. 5.Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of ScienceKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia

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