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Chemistry of Natural Compounds

, Volume 43, Issue 4, pp 454–457 | Cite as

Isolation and characteristics of highly active α-amylase from Bacillus subtilis-150

  • K. T. Normurodova
  • Sh. Kh. Nurmatov
  • B. Kh. Alimova
  • O. M. Pulatova
  • Z. R. Akhmedova
  • A. A. Makhsumkhanov
Article

Abstract

Partially purified enzyme preparation with specific activities of 153.7 U/mg for α-amylase and 0.15 U/mg for protease was produced by selective adsorption on starch. Enzymes were purified until homogeneous electrophoretically by gel-filtration over HW-55 TSK-gel with specific activities of 245 U/mg for α-amylase and 1.44 U/mg for protease. The optimum temperature and pH for purified α-amylase activity are 40–50°C and pH 6.0. The effects of various metal ions on the activity and stability of the enzyme were studied.

Key words

Bacillus subtilis-150 α-amylase protease enzyme preparation purification properties enzyme activity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. T. Normurodova
    • 1
  • Sh. Kh. Nurmatov
    • 1
  • B. Kh. Alimova
    • 1
  • O. M. Pulatova
    • 1
  • Z. R. Akhmedova
    • 1
  • A. A. Makhsumkhanov
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of MicrobiologyAcademy of Sciences of the Republic of UzbekistanTashkent

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