Advertisement

Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 55, Issue 4, pp 561–568 | Cite as

An Academic and Practice Partnership to Assess the Behavioral Health Needs of Nebraska

  • Brandon GrimmEmail author
  • Shinobu Watanabe-Galloway
  • Dave Palm
  • Lea Pounds
  • Marlene Deras
  • Sheri Dawson
  • Linda Wittmuss
  • Brittney Smith
  • Ellana Haakenstad
Original Paper

Abstract

Schools of Public Health have a commitment to engage in practice-based research and be involved in collaborative partnerships. In 2016 the faculty, staff, and students from the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public Health and the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Behavioral Health collaborated to develop and administer a comprehensive assessment of the mental health and substance use disorder services provided by the Division of Behavioral Health. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process used to develop the trusting and mutually beneficial partnership and the data tools that were created and used to assess and determine the behavioral health needs. It is unrealistic to think that practitioners could undertake a project of this magnitude on their own. It is essential to have identified processes and systems in place for others to follow.

Keywords

Needs assessment Behavioral health Practice based research 

Notes

Funding

The needs assessment was funded through a subcontract with the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Behavioral Health.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no potential conflict of interest to disclose.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was waived by the University of Nebraska Medical Center Institutional Review Board because this study qualified as a quality improvement initiative.

Research Involving Human Participants

this study was approved by the University of Nebraska Medical Center Institutional Review Board. All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

References

  1. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2016). CAHPS® experience of care and health outcomes (ECHO®) survey. Retreived September 23, 2016, from http://www.ahrq.gov/cahps/surveys-guidance/echo/instructions/index.html.
  2. Association of Schools of Public Health, Council of Public Health Practice Coordinators. (2006). Demonstrating excellence in practice-based research for public health. Retreived from http://www.aspph.org/educate/models/demonstrating-excellence-in-practice-based-research-for-public-health/.
  3. Berg, L. B. (2009). Qualitative research methods for the social sciences (7th ed.). Boston: Pearson Education Inc.Google Scholar
  4. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. (2014). About BRFSS. Retreived from http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/about/index.htm.
  5. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. (2017). Youth risk behavior surveillance system (YRBSS) overview. Retreived from http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/data/yrbs/overview.htm.
  6. Creswell, J. W. (2015). A concise introduction to mixed methods research. Thousand Oaks: SAGE.Google Scholar
  7. Grimm, B. L., Brandert, K., Palm, D., & Svoboda, C. (2016). The EDIC method: An engaging and comprehensive approach for creating health department workforce development plans. Health Promotion Practice, 18(5), 688–695.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. National Institute of Mental Health. (2017). Any mental illness (AMI) among U.S. adults. Retreived from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/statistics/prevalence/any-mental-illness-ami-among-us-adults.shtml.
  9. Nebraska Department of Education & Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services. (2015). 2014 Youth risk behavior survey results. Lincoln: University of Nebraska-Lincoln.Google Scholar
  10. Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Behavioral Health. (2013). Nebraska young adult alcohol opinion survey: 2010–2013 state summary report. Lincoln: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Behavioral Health.Google Scholar
  11. Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Behavioral Health. (2017). One Nebraska! One Plan! Strategic Plan, 2017–2020. Retreived from http://dhhs.ne.gov/Reports/Behavioral%20Health%20Strategic%20Plan%202017-2020.pdf.
  12. Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Behavioral Health, Office of Health Disparities and Health Equity. (2015). Profile of the minority population in Nebraska. Lincoln: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.Google Scholar
  13. Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health. (2017). Nebraska behavioral risk factor surveillance system (BRFSS): reports. Retreived from http://dhhs.ne.gov/publichealth/Pages/brfss_reports.aspx.
  14. Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health, Office of Health Disparities and Health Equity. (2012). Health status of American Indians in Nebraska. Lincoln: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.Google Scholar
  15. Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health, Office of Health Disparities and Health Equity. (2015). Nebraska health disparities report. Lincoln: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.Google Scholar
  16. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2017). Public health 3.0: A call to action to create a 21st century public health infrastructure. Retreived from https://www.healthypeople.gov/sites/default/files/Public-Health-3.0-White-Paper.pdf.
  17. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. National survey on drug use and health. Retreived from https://nsduhweb.rti.org/respweb/homepage.cfm.
  18. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2014). 2010–2012 National survey on drug use and health substate age group tables. Retreived from https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/substate2k12-AgeGroupTabs/NSDUHsubstateAgeGroupTabs2012.htm.
  19. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2016). Behavioral health barometer: Nebraska 2015. Rockville: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.Google Scholar
  20. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2018). Mental health statistics improvement program (MHSIP) consumer survey (draft version 1.2). Retreieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/data/.
  21. TriWest Health and Human Service Evaluation and Consulting. (2015). Omaha area adult behavioral health system assessment: Final summary of findings and recommendations. Boulder: TriWest Health and Human Service Evaluation and Consulting.Google Scholar
  22. United Health Foundation, America’s Health Rankings. (2018). Binge drinking: United States. Retreived from http://www.americashealthrankings.org/ALL/Binge.
  23. Watanabe-Galloway, S., Trout, K., Deras, M., Naveed, Z., & Chen, L. (2014). Nebraska’s behavioral health workforce—2000 to 2014. Omaha: University of Nebraska Medical Center.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Health PromotionUniversity of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public HealthOmahaUSA
  2. 2.Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public HealthOmahaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Health Services Research and AdministrationUniversity of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public HealthOmahaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Health PromotionUniversity of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public HealthOmahaUSA
  5. 5.Health Professions Tracking CenterUniversity of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public HealthOmahaUSA
  6. 6.Division of Behavioral HealthNebraska Department of Health and Human ServicesLincolnUSA

Personalised recommendations