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A Tertiary-Care/Primary-Care Partnership Aimed at Improving Care for People with Eating Disorders

  • Lea Thaler
  • Shiri Freiwald
  • Chloe Paquin Hodge
  • Émilie Fletcher
  • Danaelle Cottier
  • Esther Kahan
  • Erika Rossi
  • Myra Piat
  • Shalini Lal
  • Mimi Israel
  • Howard Steiger
Original Paper
  • 27 Downloads

Abstract

We describe the implementation and impact of a province-wide program of knowledge exchange (KE), aimed at developing capacity for the treatment of people with eating disorders (EDs). The program is designed to equip clinicians working in nonspecialized health-care installations with skills to evaluate and treat people with EDs. Trainings were conducted at 21 institutions. The majority of clinicians reported satisfaction with the KE program and indicated that the trainings enhanced their confidence and ability to treat patients with EDs. A subset of clinicians received case supervision with a specialist ED therapist and followed patients with EDs (n = 119). Treated patients showed significant improvements on eating and depressive symptoms, and reported satisfaction with the treatments they received.

Keywords

Knowledge exchange Knowledge transfer Eating disorders Anorexia nervosa Bulimia nervosa 

Notes

Funding

Most of the work reported here was made possible thanks to support for knowledge transfer from the Royal Bank of Canada, awarded to the Douglas Institute Eating Disorders Continuum (directed by Howard Steiger) and by direct EDC resources for knowledge exchange. A portion of the data reported here was also generated under the auspices of a CIHR Knowledge-to-Action grant awarded to Myra Piat and colleagues (CIHR Grant Application No. 261757).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lea Thaler
    • 1
    • 2
    • 10
  • Shiri Freiwald
    • 1
  • Chloe Paquin Hodge
    • 1
    • 2
  • Émilie Fletcher
    • 1
  • Danaelle Cottier
    • 1
  • Esther Kahan
    • 1
  • Erika Rossi
    • 1
    • 3
  • Myra Piat
    • 2
    • 4
    • 5
  • Shalini Lal
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
  • Mimi Israel
    • 1
    • 2
  • Howard Steiger
    • 1
    • 2
    • 9
  1. 1.Eating Disorders Continuum, Douglas Mental Health University InstituteMontreal West Island Integrated University Health and Social Service Centre (IUHSSC)MontrealCanada
  2. 2.Psychiatry DepartmentMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  3. 3.Psychology DepartmentUniversité du Québec à MontréalMontrealCanada
  4. 4.Douglas Institute Clinical Activities, Knowledge Transfer and Teaching DirectorateMontreal West Island Integrated University Health and Social Service Centre (IUHSSC)MontrealCanada
  5. 5.School of Social WorkMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  6. 6.School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of MedicineUniversité de MontréalMontrealCanada
  7. 7.Carrefour de l’innovation et de l’évaluation en santéCentre de recherche du Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CRCHUM)MontrealCanada
  8. 8.PEPP-Montreal and ACCESS Open Minds, Douglas Mental Health University InstituteMontreal West Island Integrated University Health and Social Service Centre (IUHSSC)MontrealCanada
  9. 9.Psychology DepartmentMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  10. 10.Eating Disorders ContinuumDouglas Mental Health University InstituteMontrealCanada

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