Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 53, Issue 4, pp 438–444

Youth Views on Communication About ADHD and Medication Adherence

  • Betsy Sleath
  • Delesha M. Carpenter
  • Robyn Sayner
  • Kathleen Thomas
  • Larry Mann
  • Adam Sage
  • Sandra H. Sulzer
  • Adrian D. Sandler
Original Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine youth perceptions of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) communication with their pediatric providers, their reported adherence to their ADHD medications, and their desired location for an ADHD educational program. Youth ages 7 through 17 with an ADHD diagnosis were recruited. A research associate interviewed the youth. Parents completed demographic questionnaires. Seventy families participated. One-third of the youth wanted more discussion about ADHD with their providers during visits. The average youth had over eight questions about ADHD and its treatment. Most youth wanted to learn about ADHD at their provider’s office. Non-white and older youth were significantly more likely to be less adherent to their ADHD medications. Youth want their providers to engage them more during visits. Providers should take advantage of this interest to engage youth more in discussions regarding ADHD and its treatment during pediatric ADHD visits.

Keywords

Children Adolescents Youth Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Communication Medication adherence 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Betsy Sleath
    • 1
  • Delesha M. Carpenter
    • 2
  • Robyn Sayner
    • 2
  • Kathleen Thomas
    • 3
  • Larry Mann
    • 4
  • Adam Sage
    • 2
  • Sandra H. Sulzer
    • 5
  • Adrian D. Sandler
    • 6
    • 7
  1. 1.UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services ResearchUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, UNC Eshelman School of PharmacyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research and Department of Health Policy and ManagementUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  4. 4.Jeffers, Mann & Artman Pediatric and Adolescent MedicineRaleighUSA
  5. 5.Department of Family MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  6. 6.Olson Huff Center, Mission Health SystemAshevilleUSA
  7. 7.Department of Pediatrics, School of MedicineUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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