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Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 44, Issue 5, pp 377–380 | Cite as

Family Contact and the Management of Medication Non-adherence in Schizophrenia

  • Joshua E. Wilk
  • Joyce C. West
  • Steven C. Marcus
  • Lisa Countis
  • Darrel A. Regier
  • Mark Olfson
Original Paper

Abstract

We compare psychiatric management of antipsychotic non-adherence among schizophrenia outpatients with high and low levels of family contact. A national survey was conducted among a random sample of psychiatrists treating schizophrenia, providing data on 310 patients. Patients were stratified by level of family contact. Psychiatrists were more likely to use family interventions to manage non-adherence among patients with high family contact. Psychiatrists were significantly more likely to change antipsychotic dosing in patients with high family contact, though less likely to start depot antipsychotic medications. Family interventions appear to be commonly used in the psychiatric management of medication non-adherence in schizophrenia.

Keywords

Schizophrenia Non-adherence Family contact Medication management Antipsychotic 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by a Grant from the National Institutes of Health (MH-61530). Poster presentation at the American Psychiatric Association 2006 Annual Meeting, Toronto, Canada May 20–25, 2006.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joshua E. Wilk
    • 1
    • 2
  • Joyce C. West
    • 1
  • Steven C. Marcus
    • 1
  • Lisa Countis
    • 1
  • Darrel A. Regier
    • 1
  • Mark Olfson
    • 3
  1. 1.American Psychiatric Practice Research Network (PRN)American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education (APIRE)ArlingtonUSA
  2. 2.Division of Psychiatry and NeuroscienceWalter Reed Army Institute of ResearchSilver SpringUSA
  3. 3.New York State Psychiatric Institute/Deptartment of PsychiatryCollege of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University ColumbiaUSA

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