Increasing Social Support for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness: Evaluating the Compeer Model of Intentional Friendship

  • Brian H. McCorkle
  • E. Sally Rogers
  • Erin C. Dunn
  • Asya Lyass
  • Yu Mui Wan
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10597-008-9137-8

Cite this article as:
McCorkle, B.H., Rogers, E.S., Dunn, E.C. et al. Community Ment Health J (2008) 44: 359. doi:10.1007/s10597-008-9137-8
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Abstract

We conducted a quasi-experimental study of Compeer, which matches community volunteers and people with SMI to increase social support. Seventy-five adults with SMI received community psychiatric treatments-usual (TAU) while 79 adults received Compeer services plus TAU. Compeer clients reported significant improvements in social support and a trend towards improved subjective well-being. After 6 months, social support increased >1 SD for 13%, increasing to 23% at 12 months, supporting qualitative research suggesting the “active ingredient” in intentional friendships often takes more than 1 year to develop. This subgroup of responders showed significant gains in subjective well-being and reductions in psychiatric symptoms.

Keywords

Community support programs Social support Social skills training Psychiatric rehabilitation Compeer 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian H. McCorkle
    • 1
  • E. Sally Rogers
    • 2
  • Erin C. Dunn
    • 4
  • Asya Lyass
    • 2
  • Yu Mui Wan
    • 3
  1. 1.The Albert & Jessie Danielsen Institute at Boston UniversityBostonUSA
  2. 2.Center for Psychiatric RehabilitationBoston UniversityWest BostonUSA
  3. 3.Elementary and Secondary EducationMassachusetts Department of EducationMaldenUSA
  4. 4.Center for College Health and SafetyEducation Development Center, IncNewtonUSA

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