Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 42, Issue 2, pp 143–159 | Cite as

Demographic Characteristics and Employment Among People with Severe Mental Illness in a Multisite Study

  • Jane K. Burke-Miller
  • Judith A. Cook
  • Dennis D. Grey
  • Lisa A. Razzano
  • Crystal R. Blyler
  • H. Stephen Leff
  • Paul B. Gold
  • Richard W. Goldberg
  • Kim T. Mueser
  • William L. Cook
  • Sue K. Hoppe
  • Michelle Stewart
  • Laura Blankertz
  • Kenn Dudek
  • Amanda L. Taylor
  • Martha Ann Carey
Article

Abstract

People with psychiatric disabilities experience disproportionately high rates of unemployment. As research evidence is mounting regarding effective vocational programs, interest is growing in identifying subgroup variations. Data from a multisite research and demonstration program were analyzed to identify demographic characteristics associated with employment outcomes, after adjusting for the effects of program, services, and study site. Longitudinal analyses found that people with more recent work history, younger age, and higher education were more likely to achieve competitive employment and to work more hours per month, while race and gender effects varied by employment outcome. Results provide strong evidence of demographic subgroup variation and need.

Key words

psychiatric disability employment demographic characteristics. 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane K. Burke-Miller
    • 1
  • Judith A. Cook
    • 1
  • Dennis D. Grey
    • 1
  • Lisa A. Razzano
    • 1
  • Crystal R. Blyler
    • 2
  • H. Stephen Leff
    • 3
  • Paul B. Gold
    • 4
  • Richard W. Goldberg
    • 5
  • Kim T. Mueser
    • 6
  • William L. Cook
    • 7
  • Sue K. Hoppe
    • 8
  • Michelle Stewart
    • 9
  • Laura Blankertz
    • 10
  • Kenn Dudek
    • 11
  • Amanda L. Taylor
    • 1
  • Martha Ann Carey
    • 12
  1. 1.Center on Mental Health Services Research and PolicyUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Center for Mental Health ServicesSubstance Abuse and Mental Health Services AdministrationRockvilleUSA
  3. 3.Human Services Research InstituteCambridgeUSA
  4. 4.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of MarylandBaltimoreUSA
  6. 6.New Hampshire-Dartmouth Psychiatric Research CenterDartmouth Medical SchoolHanoverUSA
  7. 7.Department of PsychiatryMaine Medical CenterPortlandUSA
  8. 8.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Texas Health Sciences CenterSan AntonioUSA
  9. 9.Community Rehabilitation DivisionUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  10. 10.Matrix Research InstitutePhiladelphiaUSA
  11. 11.Fountain HouseNew YorkUSA
  12. 12.Center for Mental Health ServicesSubstance Abuse and Mental Health Services AdministrationRockvilleUSA

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