Conservation Genetics

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 1243–1246

Five hundred microsatellite loci for Peromyscus

  • Jesse N. Weber
  • Maureen B. Peters
  • Olga V. Tsyusko
  • Catherine R. Linnen
  • Cris Hagen
  • Nancy A. Schable
  • Tracey D. Tuberville
  • Anna M. McKee
  • Stacey L. Lance
  • Kenneth L. Jones
  • Heidi S. Fisher
  • Michael J. Dewey
  • Hopi E. Hoekstra
  • Travis C. Glenn
Technical Note

Abstract

Mice of the genus Peromyscus, including several endangered subspecies, occur throughout North America and have been important models for conservation research. We describe 526 primer pairs that amplify microsatellite DNA loci for Peromyscus maniculatus bairdii, 467 of which also amplify in Peromyscus polionotus subgriseus. For 12 of these loci, we report diversity data from a natural population. These markers will be an important resource for future genomic studies of Peromyscus evolution and mammalian conservation.

Keywords

Microsatellite Peromyscus maniculatus Peromyscus polionotus SSR STR PCR primers 

Supplementary material

10592_2009_9941_MOESM1_ESM.doc (1.7 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 1702 kb)
10592_2009_9941_MOESM2_ESM.doc (2 mb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOC 2032 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jesse N. Weber
    • 1
  • Maureen B. Peters
    • 2
  • Olga V. Tsyusko
    • 2
    • 3
  • Catherine R. Linnen
    • 1
  • Cris Hagen
    • 2
  • Nancy A. Schable
    • 2
  • Tracey D. Tuberville
    • 2
  • Anna M. McKee
    • 2
  • Stacey L. Lance
    • 2
    • 4
  • Kenneth L. Jones
    • 4
  • Heidi S. Fisher
    • 1
  • Michael J. Dewey
    • 5
  • Hopi E. Hoekstra
    • 1
  • Travis C. Glenn
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and The Museum of Comparative ZoologyHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Savannah River Ecology LaboratoryUniversity of GeorgiaAikenUSA
  3. 3.Department of Plant and Soil SciencesUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Environmental Health ScienceUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  5. 5.Peromyscus Genetic Stock Center, Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA

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