Conservation Genetics

, 10:1873 | Cite as

Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for Brachiaria brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich.) Stap

  • L. Jungmann
  • A. C. B. Sousa
  • J. Paiva
  • P. M. Francisco
  • B. B. Z. Vigna
  • C. B. do Valle
  • M. I. Zucchi
  • A. P. de Souza
Technical Note

Abstract

The first set of nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci for Brachiaria brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich.) Stap is described. A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed and 19 loci were characterized. About 13 SSR loci were found to be polymorphic and across-taxa amplification tests showed that six of them can be transferred to four other species of Brachiaria. This new SSR resource will be a powerful tool for population genetic studies of B. brizantha, for interspecific genetic studies within the genus Brachiaria, for mapping and for marker assisted selection in breeding.

Keywords

Brachiaria brizantha Microsatellite markers Genetic diversity Transferability 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Jungmann
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. C. B. Sousa
    • 2
  • J. Paiva
    • 2
  • P. M. Francisco
    • 2
  • B. B. Z. Vigna
    • 2
  • C. B. do Valle
    • 1
  • M. I. Zucchi
    • 3
  • A. P. de Souza
    • 2
  1. 1.Embrapa Beef CattlePlant Biotechnology LaboratoryCampo GrandeBrazil
  2. 2.State University of Campinas (Unicamp)Center for Molecular Biology and Genetic EngineeringCampinasBrazil
  3. 3.Agronomic Institute of Campinas (IAC)CampinasBrazil

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