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Conservation Genetics

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 671–673 | Cite as

Ten polymorphic microsatellite loci in Tibetan chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus

  • Kong Yang
  • Xia Luo
  • Yong Wang
  • Ying Yu
  • Zhihua Chen
Research Article

Abstract

Through an improved enrichment protocol, a genomic library for (AC)12 repeats was constructed and 34 microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized in an endangered animal, Tibetan chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus. In the 34 loci, ten loci showed a distinct allelic variation ranging from 4 to 14 alleles in 54 individuals tested. Polymorphism information content (PIC) ranged from 0.590 to 0.869 with an average of 0.713. Average observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.7988 (ranged from 0.310 to 1.000) and 0.7495 (ranged from 0.609 to 0.897), respectively. These ten microsatellites loci would be the valuable genetic markers for further investigation of Tibetan chicken.

Keywords

Tibetan chicken Microsatellite (AC)n 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank Dr. Wenping Zhang and Xiuyue Zhang for giving us a lot of help in data analysis and advices in experiments. This research was funded by the Sichuan Youth Science and Technology Foundation (08ZQ026-027) and Southwest University for Nationalities Foundation of P. R. China.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kong Yang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xia Luo
    • 3
  • Yong Wang
    • 2
  • Ying Yu
    • 1
  • Zhihua Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Life Sciences and TechnologySouthwest University for NationalitiesChengduPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Key Laboratory for The Qing-Tibet Plateau Animal Genetic Resource Conservation and Exploitation of Sichuan ProvinceChengduPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.College of ManagementSouthwest University for NationalitiesChengduPeople’s Republic of China

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