Conservation Genetics

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 1177–1179 | Cite as

Variable nuclear markers for a Sonoran Desert bark beetle, Araptus attenuatus Wood (Curculionidae: Scolytinae), with applications to related genera

  • R. C. Garrick
  • C. A. Meadows
  • J. D. Nason
  • A. I. Cognato
  • R. J. Dyer
Technical Note

Abstract

We report eight new co-dominant nuclear markers for population genetics of the bark beetle Araptus attenuatus Wood. Several loci include introns from low-copy genes, and four cross-amplify in one or more related genera. The markers show moderate levels of polymorphism (2–19 alleles per locus), and no loci showed significant deviations from Hardy–Weinberg or linkage equilibrium across both of the two populations examined, consistent with Mendelian inheritance patterns.

Keywords

Baja Peninsula Co-dominant loci Coleoptera Introns Population structure 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was funded by National Science Foundation grant DEB-0543102 to RJD and JDN and, in part, by the National Research Initiative of the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Grant 2003-35302-13381 to AIC.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. C. Garrick
    • 1
  • C. A. Meadows
    • 1
  • J. D. Nason
    • 2
  • A. I. Cognato
    • 3
  • R. J. Dyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA
  2. 2.Department of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal BiologyIowa State UniversityAmesUSA
  3. 3.Department of EntomologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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