Conservation Genetics

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 535–538 | Cite as

Ten microsatellite loci from Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus)

  • Brant C. Faircloth
  • Theron M. Terhune
  • Nancy A. Schable
  • Travis C. Glenn
  • William E. Palmer
  • John P. Carroll
Technical Note

Abstract

Ecological studies using microsatellite data often require the selection of an optimal marker set for use in parentage and relatedness inference. Commonly, this requires a candidate pool of microsatellite markers from which several are selected to ensure data are acquired efficiently and accurately. We developed 10 microsatellite loci for use with Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and tested these loci using individuals collected from two distinct populations in GA and VA. Our new markers yielded seven alleles/locus (range: 2–16) in the Georgia population and six alleles/locus (range: 2–13) in the Virginia population. Exclusionary power of all markers in each population with both parents unknown was >0.98. These microsatellite loci should be combined with previously developed markers to select an optimal set for use in subsequent analyses of parentage and relatedness.

Keywords

Microsatellites SSRs Galliformes Northern Bobwhite Colinus virginianus 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brant C. Faircloth
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Theron M. Terhune
    • 1
  • Nancy A. Schable
    • 3
  • Travis C. Glenn
    • 3
    • 4
  • William E. Palmer
    • 2
  • John P. Carroll
    • 1
  1. 1.D. B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural ResourcesUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.Tall Timbers Research Station and Land ConservancyTallahasseeUSA
  3. 3.Savannah River Ecology LaboratoryUniversity of GeorgiaAikenUSA
  4. 4.Environmental Health Science, College of Public HealthUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  5. 5.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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