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Conservation Genetics

, Volume 9, Issue 5, pp 1281–1285 | Cite as

Genetic analysis of forest species Eugenia uniflora L. through of newly developed SSR markers

  • Ronai Ferreira-Ramos
  • Prianda R. Laborda
  • Melissa de Oliveira Santos
  • Matheus S. Mayor
  • Moacyr A. Mestriner
  • Anete P. de Souza
  • Ana Lilia Alzate-MarinEmail author
Short Communication

Abstract

Nine microsatellite loci for genetic analysis of three populations of the tropical tree Eugenia uniflora L. (pitanga or Brazilian cherry) from fragments of semideciduous forest were developed. We used the technique of building a (GA) n and (CA) n microsatellite-enriched library by capture with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. We assessed the polymorphism of seven microsatellites in 84 mature trees found in three areas (Ribeirão Preto, Tambaú and São José do Rio Pardo), highly impacted by the agricultural practices, in a large region among Pardo river and Mogi-Guaçu river basins, in state of São Paulo, Brazil. All loci were polymorphic, and the number of alleles was high, ranging from 6 to 24, with a mean of 14.4. All stands showed the same high level of genetic diversity (mean H E  = 0.83) and a low genetic differentiation (mean F ST = 0.031), indicating that genetic diversity was higher within rather than among populations. Seven of the nine loci were highly variable, and sufficiently informative for E. uniflora. It was concluded that these new SSR markers can be efficiently used for gene flow studies.

Keywords

Conservation Development Forest Genetic diversity Myrtaceae Pitanga 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was financed by a grant from Sao Paulo State Government to ALAM: FAPESP 03/04199-4/2004. We also acknowledge the support of Research Pro-rectory of Sao Paulo University (USP) for ALAM and FAEPA for MAM. This study is part of the postgraduate work of first author. Ana Lilia Alzate-Marin was supported by Researcher assistantship from FAPESP. Ronai Ferreira-Ramos was supported by a postgraduate fellowship of FAPESP. The authors would like to thank to Dr. Alexandre Sebbenn and Marcela Corbo Guidugli for the statistical support, Dr. David de Jong for the language revision, and Maria do Carmo Tomitão Canas and Ana Lucia Pimentel for the technical support in microsatellite analyses.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronai Ferreira-Ramos
    • 1
    • 2
  • Prianda R. Laborda
    • 3
  • Melissa de Oliveira Santos
    • 3
  • Matheus S. Mayor
    • 2
  • Moacyr A. Mestriner
    • 2
  • Anete P. de Souza
    • 3
  • Ana Lilia Alzate-Marin
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia ComparadaUniversidade de São Paulo (USP)Ribeirão PretoBrazil
  2. 2.Laboratório de Genética Vegetal, Departamento de GenéticaUniversidade de São PauloRibeirão PretoBrazil
  3. 3.Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia GenéticaUniversidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp)CampinasBrazil

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