Conservation Genetics

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 457–459 | Cite as

Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for Cedrela odorata L. (Meliaceae), a high value neotropical tree

  • G. Hernández
  • A. Buonamici
  • K. Walker
  • G. G. Vendramin
  • C. Navarro
  • S. Cavers
Technical Note

Abstract

We describe 9 primers for amplification of microsatellite loci for the Neotropical tree Cedrela odorata L. (Meliaceae). Loci were isolated from an enriched library derived from a single DNA sample from a tree in Costa Rica. Levels of polymorphism were determined using samples from a large progeny trial. Across loci, the number of alleles ranged from 14 to 30. Observed heterozygosity levels ranged from 0.61 to 0.88. No linkage disequilibria were detected although some departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) were found, probably due to a Wahlund effect.

Keywords

Cedrela odorata Cedar Meliaceae Microsatellites 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Hernández
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Buonamici
    • 3
  • K. Walker
    • 2
  • G. G. Vendramin
    • 3
  • C. Navarro
    • 1
  • S. Cavers
    • 2
  1. 1.Centro Agrónomico Tropical de Investigación y EnseñanzaTurrialbaCosta Rica
  2. 2.NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH EdinburghMidlothianScotland, UK
  3. 3.Plant Genetics InstituteConsiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR)Sesto FiorentinoItaly

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