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Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 176–182 | Cite as

Common Factors as a Road Map to MFT Model Integration: Implications for Training Therapists

Original Paper

Abstract

Historically, model integration was reserved for experienced therapists (Lebow, J Marital Fam Ther 13:1–14, 1987. doi: 10.1111/j.1752-0606.1987.tb00678.x). Currently, many marriage and family therapy (MFT) training programs encourage trainees to develop an integrative therapy approach. This relatively new phenomenon of encouraging integration during training is not often discussed. One challenge of developing an integrative approach to therapy practice is that trainees may not receive formal training in how to thoughtfully integrate models (Lebow, J Marital Fam Ther 13:1–14, 1987. doi: 10.1111/j.1752-0606.1987.tb00678.x). Training therapists would benefit from an explicit road map to integration, the common factors approach is one such roadmap. The common factors approach may be a useful integrational construct (Weeks and Chad, Guid Couns 19:57–64, 2004. doi: 10.1177/1066480708323205) for guiding trainees in their initial understanding of model integration. The present conceptual paper presents a rationale for the usefulness of common factors in informing integration and supports a more prominent role of common factors in MFT training.

Keywords

Model integration Common factors Training 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Human Development, Marriage and Family TherapyVirginia Tech.BlacksburgUSA

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