Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 113–121 | Cite as

Towards the Development of Educational Core Competencies for Couple and Family Therapy Technology Practices

  • Markie L. C. Blumer
  • Katherine M. Hertlein
  • Megan L. VandenBosch
Original Paper

Abstract

Rises in technology have created change in the family therapy field. The ethics code and regulatory boards now include areas on technology in family therapy practices. These additions require competency in the area of couple and family therapy technology practices. Previous researchers suggest there is a gap between these competencies needed and the training provided, as well as the research available. Thus, the purpose of this mixed-data survey study was to gain information regarding family therapists’ experiences and perceptions of education regarding online family therapy practices. To do this, we administered a survey to family therapists across the United States. Reported, are both quantitative, as well as qualitative findings. The majority of the sample reported that they did not learn about online technologies in clinical practice; however the majority of the participants would like to learn more about couple and family therapy technology practices. The most direct implication of the findings from our study is the need to offer specific education around couple and family therapy technology practices. Suggested core competency areas to cover include theory, research, and practice around technology.

Keywords

Core competencies Couple and family technology Couple and family therapy technology Family therapy education Marriage and family therapy education Technology 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Markie L. C. Blumer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Katherine M. Hertlein
    • 3
  • Megan L. VandenBosch
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Human Development and Family StudiesUniversity of Wisconsin-StoutMenomonieUSA
  2. 2.Certificate in Sex Therapy ProgramUniversity of Wisconsin-StoutMenomonieUSA
  3. 3.Marriage and Family Therapy ProgramUniversity of NevadaLas VegasUSA

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