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Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 36, Issue 4, pp 452–461 | Cite as

A Content Analysis for the Continued Identification of Medical Family Therapy Competencies

  • Scott R. Michaels
  • Angela L. LamsonEmail author
  • Mark B. White
  • Susan L. McCammon
  • Priti Desai
Original Paper

Abstract

Medical family therapy (MedFT) is an emerging profession—where family therapy and healthcare intersect—that has had dramatic growth in the past two decades. Although identifying MedFT skills and competencies undoubtedly began with the birth of the field, the first discrete and specific sets of MedFT skills and competencies were published in 2012. In this article, we discuss the competencies from health psychology, medical social work, and the existing lists of MedFT competencies. Through a content analysis, the competencies were coded and reorganized to identify ways to capture additional skills that could be added to the current MedFT competencies and are particularly relevant to the work of MedFTs. It became apparent through this content analysis that MedFT experts must identify competencies pertaining to training in relational health, research, and unique clinical skills. Recommendations are made to further build on the current MedFT competencies by: (a) prioritizing the family, collaboration, and interprofessional communication; (b) including more competencies regarding assessment, case management, consultation, administration, research, program evaluation, training, and supervision; and (c) creating competencies for all levels of proficiency.

Keywords

Competencies Content analysis Health psychology Marriage and family therapy Medical family therapy Medical social work 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott R. Michaels
    • 2
  • Angela L. Lamson
    • 1
    Email author
  • Mark B. White
    • 3
  • Susan L. McCammon
    • 1
  • Priti Desai
    • 1
  1. 1.East Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA
  2. 2.East Carolina UniversityRaleighUSA
  3. 3.Northcentral UniversityPrescott ValleyUSA

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