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Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 156–170 | Cite as

Medical Family Therapy: A Theoretical and Empirical Review

  • Lisa E. Tyndall
  • Jennifer L. Hodgson
  • Angela L. Lamson
  • Mark White
  • Sharon M. Knight
Original Paper

Abstract

Medical Family Therapy (MedFT) is a relatively young sub-specialty founded initially at the intersection of Family Therapy and Family Medicine. The purpose of this article is to synthesize and review scholarly literature covering almost 30 years of history, growth, and available research on MedFT. Eighty-two articles that met specific inclusion criteria were reviewed and the literature was categorized into four distinct themes: (a) Emergence of MedFT in the literature; (b) Contemporary MedFT skills and applications; (c) Punctuating the “family therapy” in MedFT; and (d) MedFT effectiveness and efficacy research. What was learned was that MedFT is growing so rapidly there is now a need for a current definition, identification of core curriculum standards and competencies for training, as well as a commitment to produce rigorous research on its effectiveness and efficacy. Recommendations to advance efforts across the foci are provided.

Keywords

Medical family therapy Family therapy Biopsychosocial Collaboration 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisa E. Tyndall
    • 1
  • Jennifer L. Hodgson
    • 1
  • Angela L. Lamson
    • 1
  • Mark White
    • 1
  • Sharon M. Knight
    • 1
  1. 1.East Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA

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