Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp 71–84 | Cite as

Virginia Satir’s Family Camp Experiment: An Intentional Growth Community Still in Process

Original Paper

Abstract

In 1976, Virginia Satir began Satir Family Camp (SFC) with therapists and their personal families. Initially, it was a context for the family to experience Satir’s concepts and techniques so that the family system would change along with the therapist. The training of therapists is no longer a significant part of camp; relationships with self, family, friends, and the community is now the main focal point. The process and governance of the camp is presented along with a lengthy anecdote of an experiential family session. These two features—community function and personal/familial growth—inextricably work together to provide a validating environment that supports desired changes.

Keywords

Virginia Satir Experiential family therapy Intentional growth communities Self of the therapist Integration of Satir therapy Psychomotor Therapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.South Carolina Institute for Systemic/Experiential TherapyColumbiaUSA

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