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Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 32, Issue 4, pp 427–443 | Cite as

Inviting the Significant Other of LGBT Clients into Substance Abuse Treatment Programs: Frequency and Impact

  • Evan Senreich
Original Paper

Abstract

In the New York Metropolitan area, convenience samples of 194 LGBT and 107 heterosexual former clients of substance abuse programs were compared in regard to rate of invitation of their significant others into treatment for at least one session. No significant differences between sexual orientation groups were found. For LGBT respondents, inviting significant others into treatment resulted in improved program completion rates, greater satisfaction with treatment, enhanced feelings of counselor support, and higher abstinence rates at the end of treatment. For women, not having a significant other predicted higher abstinence rates at the end of treatment.

Keywords

Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Sexual orientation Substance abuse treatment Significant others Partners Gender Women 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The researcher would like to thank Dr. Barbara Warren, Director of Organizational Development, Planning, and Research at the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center in Manhattan, for allowing this study to recruit participants outside of 12-step meetings in the lobby of that facility.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Lehman CollegeCity University of New YorkBronxUSA

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