Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 31, Issue 2, pp 160–168 | Cite as

The Assessment of Marital Adjustment with Muslim Populations: A Reliability Study of the Locke–Wallace Marital Adjustment Test

Original Paper

Abstract

The Muslim population is growing rapidly throughout the world and a sizable population of 6–8 million Muslims is estimated in North America alone. This population deals with a vast array of issues, including marital adjustment. Nevertheless, the marriage and family literature lacks the research needed to facilitate therapeutic treatment with Muslim couples adequately. Marital adjustment assessments that are commonly utilized have been tested on predominantly Anglo-American or Caucasian couples. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the Locke–Wallace marital adjustment test’s (LWMAT) reliability when administered to married, Muslim-American people.

Keywords

Muslim Locke–Wallace marital adjustment test Marital adjustment Life distress inventory Muslim-American 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.St. Mary’s UniversitySan AntonioUSA
  2. 2.St. Mary’s UniversitySan AntonioUSA

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