Destabilization of covert networks

Article

Abstract

Covert networks are often difficult to reason about, manage and destabilize. In part, this is because they are a complex adaptive system. In addition, this is due to the nature of the data available on these systems. Making these covert networks less adaptive, more predictable, more consistent will make it easier to contain or constrain their activity. But, how can we inhibit adaptation? Herein, covert networks are characterized as dynamic multi-mode multi-plex networks. Dynamic network analysis tools are used to assess their structure and identify effective destabilization strategies that inhibit the adaptivity of these groups.

Keywords

Terrorism Social networks Dynamic network analysis Multi-agent modeling Counter-terrorism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Software Research International, School of Computer ScienceCarnegie Mellon UniversityUSA

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