Clinical & Experimental Metastasis

, Volume 26, Issue 4, pp 299–309

Imaging and quantifying the dynamics of tumor-associated proteolysis

  • Mansoureh Sameni
  • Dora Cavallo-Medved
  • Julie Dosescu
  • Christopher Jedeszko
  • Kamiar Moin
  • Stefanie R. Mullins
  • Mary B. Olive
  • Deborah Rudy
  • Bonnie F. Sloane
Research Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10585-008-9218-7

Cite this article as:
Sameni, M., Cavallo-Medved, D., Dosescu, J. et al. Clin Exp Metastasis (2009) 26: 299. doi:10.1007/s10585-008-9218-7

Abstract

The roles of proteases in cancer are dynamic. Furthermore, the roles or functions of any one protease may differ from one stage of cancer to another. Proteases from tumor-associated cells (e.g., fibroblasts, inflammatory cells, endothelial cells) as well as from tumor cells make important contributions to ‘tumor proteolysis’. Many tumors exhibit increases in expression of proteases at the level of transcripts and protein; however, whether those proteases play causal roles in malignant progression is known for only a handful of proteases. What the critical substrate or substrates that are cleaved in vivo by any given protease is also known for only a few proteases. Therefore, the recent development of techniques and reagents for live cell imaging of protease activity, in conjunction with informed knowledge of critical natural substrates, should help to define protease functions. Here we describe live cell assays for imaging proteolysis, protocols for quantifying proteolysis and the use of such assays to follow the dynamics of proteolysis by tumor cells alone and tumor cells interacting with other cells found in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, we describe an in vitro model that recapitulates the architecture of the mammary gland, a model designed to determine the effects of dynamic interactions with the surrounding microenvironment on ‘tumor proteolysis’ and the respective contributions of various cell types to ‘tumor proteolysis’. The assays and models described here could serve as screening platforms for the identification of proteolytic pathways that are potential therapeutic targets and for further development of technologies and imaging probes for in vivo use.

Keywords

Imaging probes Invasion Malignant progression Proteolytic pathways Tumor microenvironment 

Abbreviations

10A

MCF-10A human breast epithelial cell line

3D

Three dimensions

4D

Three dimensions + time

AT1

MCF10.AT1 atypical hyperplastic cell line

BSA

Bovine serum albumin

CA1d

MCF10.CA1d breast carcinoma cell line

DQ

Dye-quenched

DCIS1

MCF10.DCIS breast ductal carcinoma in situ cell line

ECM

Extracellular matrix

FITC

Fluorescein isothiocyanate

HUVEC

Human umbilical vein endothelial cells

MAME

Mammary architecture and microenvironment engineering

MMP

Matrix metalloproteinase

neoT

MCF-10AneoT ras-transfected breast epithelial cell line

rBM

Reconstituted basement membrane

uPA

Urokinase plasminogen activator

Supplementary material

10585_2008_9218_MOESM1_ESM.mov (5.3 mb)
Supplemental Fig. 4 movieTime-course for degradation of DQ-collagen IV as HUVECs form cord-like structures in vitro. HUVEC were grown for 18 h on glass coverslips coated with rBM containing 25 μg/ml DQ-collagen IV. The movie depicts confocal image in real-time of proteolysis by live HUVECs over a time period from 2 – 18 h after plating. DQ-collagen IV degradation products (green) are seen surrounding the cord-like structures (MOV 5448 kb)
Supplemental Fig. 6 movie

Time-course for degradation of DQ-collagen I as human breast fibroblasts migrate on a matrix of collagen I containing DQ-collagen I. Movie depicts confocal image in real-time of proteolysis by live fibroblasts over a 90 min period starting 2 hr after plating. Discrete dots of fluorescent degradation products (green) appear as the cells detach from the matrix (MP4 205 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mansoureh Sameni
    • 1
  • Dora Cavallo-Medved
    • 1
    • 2
  • Julie Dosescu
    • 1
  • Christopher Jedeszko
    • 1
  • Kamiar Moin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stefanie R. Mullins
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Mary B. Olive
    • 1
  • Deborah Rudy
    • 1
  • Bonnie F. Sloane
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology, School of MedicineWayne State UniversityDetroitUSA
  2. 2.Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer InstituteWayne State UniversityDetroitUSA
  3. 3.Department of Medical OncologyFox Chase Cancer CenterPhiladelphiaUSA

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